Absurdly Bright Light

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Exactly What It Says on the Tin, a Comedy trope in which a light is far brighter than any Real Life light of that type, or possibly anything short of the sun. Generally established by panning all the way out to space with the beam still visible. Bonus points if the the light bulb used is tiny.

Can lead to: Blinded by the Light.


Examples of Absurdly Bright Light include:


Advertising[edit | hide | hide all]

  • Not uncommon in battery commercials such as one Duracell commercial showing a set of kids replacing a flashlight battery with their most recent battery, and then panning out to show the beam from said flashlight cutting through space.

Anime and Manga[edit | hide]

  • The light given off by the jewel meat and anyone who eats it in Toriko. Particularly in the Bonus Material at the end of the episode where the reporter eats some and the glow blows up the film crew's equipment.
  • In one of the One Piece movies, Nami, is very interested in helping two orphans find the treasure their father spent his life working for, until she is reminded by Usopp that she can't actually keep it, to which she says she knows. When the kids say they don't actually care that much about the treasure itself, and she can have it if she wants, her smile blinds all those in the cave with her.

Film[edit | hide]

  • The activation of the Depelter Turbo on Over the Hedge is so bright it gives the other characters a tan, pops a bag of microwave popcorn, and can even be seen from space.
  • King Neptune's bald head on The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie shines so brightly it burns one poor guy's eyes.
  • When Clark W. Griswold finally gets the Christmas lights (all 25,000) working in National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, the resultant light causes the stuffy next-door neighbors to be momentarily blinded causing damage as they stumble about, and the local power plant to have to activate auxiliary power to accommodate the increased electrical usage.
  • In Deck The Halls, Danny DeVito's character wants to decorate his house so that the lights can be seen from space. This creates the major conflict.

Live-Action TV[edit | hide]

  • In at least one Christmas Episode of Home Improvement, Tim tries to win the neighborhood Christmas ornament contest using lights so bright they blot out the sun.
    • Another involved a set of lights that were so bright they cut through a thick Michigan fog and let a circling plane safely land.
  • Roseanne and family rebel against the neighborhood association's edicts for tasteful Christmas decorations with an unseen display of decorations so gaudy that they put on sunglasses before turning them on. The camera stays in the dark house; light blasts in through the windows.
  • On Malcolm in the Middle, Francis lights up some fireworks, the last of which turns the nighttime scene as bright as day. Afterwards the others wonder when their sight would return.
  • An episode of Grounded for Life had an overly helpful relative switch the family over to new energy efficient bulbs, cue a room full of 300W lamps with wisps of smoke rising from each.
  • In an episode of Seinfeld, Kramer protests a Kenny Rogers Roasters restaurant because its neon sign is too bright keeping him awake at night.

Video Games[edit | hide]

  • In Battlefield 3 the unlock-able flashlight attachment for most guns. This flashlight is literally brighter than the in game sun (at least on X-box) and if glanced from a close distance, can completely cover the screen in white.
  • In Kinnikuman: Muscle Fight, Mr. Nakano has a super where he can blind his foes by removing his wig and reflecting the light off his bald scalp.

Western Animation[edit | hide]

  • On Rocko's Modern Life, Filbert, Rocko and Heffer are in high school asked to make a lamp out of a potato. Heffer eats the potato and several potato chips, and Filbert, in frustration, starts stuffing other items down Heffer's throat, ending with the lightbulb for the potato lamp. To their astonishment, the bulb lights up, and they start stuffing Heffer with potato products. The next morning, they present Heffer as the lamp. At first it doesn't light up, but then all the lights in town go dark and Heffer's bulb lights up so brightly it forms a beam that bursts through the roof and out into space.