Supernatural (TV series)/Fridge

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Fridge Brilliance

  • Why does Jessie the Antichrist speak and act like such an adult when Sam and Dean first meet him? One would assume that it was due to the fact that his parents work all the time, and therefore he has to look after himself, but also because anything the Antichrist believes becomes true. He thinks he is an adult, therefore he is one! Hence why his maturity level suddenly drops when he says to Sam "But I'm just a kid!" - he realizes he's just a child, cue sudden maturity decrease.
  • Why is the boys' dialogue so saturated with references? Because they were left alone in hotel rooms nearly 24/7 and had nothing better to do than watch whatever came on television.
  • In "All Hell Breaks Loose Part 2," Azazel, after telekinetically pinning Dean to the tombstone and mocking him, tries to shoot him with the last bullet in the Colt. Why would Azazel waste the last available usage (at that time) of such a powerful weapon on Dean, when he could easily have killed him any number of ways? It doesn't seem to make sense...until three seasons later, when we find out that Dean is the designated vessel for the Archangel Michael, and the angels will keep resurrecting him as often as he dies to make sure he's available to use. And at that point, you realize what Azazel was doing: Trying to destroy Michael's vessel with the one weapon that could do so with such finality that even Heaven's power couldn't resurrect him, thus guaranteeing Lucifer's victory from the get-go.
  • Ava's the villian? How did she survive that long without food and manage to hide all her victims....EWWWWWWWW!
  • While Sam and Dean's relationship is outright stated by Gabriel to mirror that of the archangels, the dialogue between Lucifer and Michael in the 5th season mimics the many arguments between Sam and Dean in Seasons 1 and 4: Michael is the obedient soldier who faults his brother for rebelling against their missing father, while Lucifer believes he is doing the only thing he can, following a bad road to stop something he sees as horrible, with little regard for everyone else involved.
  • At first it seems odd that a soulless Sam would be having sex at every opportunity, considering his detatchment from anything else emotional...until you remember that sex is a biological imperitive. Without a soul, he'd actually want it more.
    • Don't forget that without a soul he wouldn't care about that pesky Cartwright Curse.
  • Trickster/Gabriel may have been killing Dean repeatedly so that Sam wouldn't be so easy for Ruby to manipulate, to stop the Apocalypse from even being put into motion as Sam wouldn't kill Lilith.
  • This Troper thought that it was strange that no one had realized that a Trickster can fake their death, given how much Bobby knew about them... and then we find out that the Trickster is Gabriel, and most Tricksters probably can't pull off that feat. And then there's the fact that what will kill a Trickster won't kill an Angel.
  • If Chuck is God, means that when Chuck was apologizing for making them live bad writing, he was apologizing for their entire lives. And what was about to come.
  • Back in the season 2 episode "Croatoan," it turns out the whole thing was a test to see if Sam was immune to the Croatoan virus. In season 5, we find out Sam is Lucifer's vessel. A big part of Lucifer's endgame involves unleashing the Croatoan virus on the world. It sure would suck for Lucifer if his vessel got infected, wouldn't it?
  • In the Season 6 finale, Castiel being one step ahead of Team Winchester is foreshadowing how he would manage to get one step in front of Crowley and Raphael.
  • For a while, this troper wondered why Sam was such a jackass after losing his soul, since it didn't really make sense that he would act the way he did: after all, even in S4, when he was high off demon blood, he still acted recognizably like Sam. That's when it hit her: in "Swan Song", he drank GALLONS of demon blood, which Castiel once told Dean would change Sam into a monster! Of course he was a jackass, he was operating solely on demon-blood-fuel! Oh, Sam. Oh, Supernatural.
  • At first, it seemed like a writer slip-up that Castiel wouldn't recognize that Christian Campbell was possessed, given that angels were already proven to be able to see the true faces of demons. But since both Castiel and Possessed!Christian were working for Crowley and Castiel most likely KNEW about the Campbell clan already, maybe this wasn't a mistake after all.
  • Why does Death eat cheap, fatty foods? It's not good for him; that stuff kills peop-oh. Ohhh.
  • Souls are a powerful energy source, and as of the Season 6 finale it appears that consuming enough souls turns you into a god. Perhaps that finally explains why the pagan gods are all into human sacrifices, even if they shouldn't be: because if souls go to Christian-esque Heaven or Hell when they die, not any of the pagan afterlives, perhaps it's the only way for the gods to get at human souls.
  • Adam. His name? A reference to his eventual role as Michael's (backup) vessel, seeing as how the archangel Michael is the original Adam's "guardian angel" in Christian mythos. His birthdate? September 29th - a day celebrating all angels, but most importantly the archangel Michael! The writers had the Adam-Michael connection planned out from his introduction!
  • Why didn't Mary remember Dean's warnings about getting out of bed on November 2, 1983 or Azazel telling her he'd come to her house in ten years in time? After all, you'd think a hunter would remember warnings like that, especially as the big day approaches and her deal comes due. Because Michael erases her memories in "The Song Remains the Same" - of the warnings and maybe even making the deal in the first place. Otherwise, she'd remember what was said and wouldn't get killed on the ceiling, John wouldn't take his kids on a crazy revenge mission, and the Apocalypse would be a no-go. It was only when she was face-to-face with the YED that she was allowed to remember.
  • The Trickster/ Gabriel has to be one of the ultimate examples. His lesson to Sam in "Mystery Spot" becomes a lot clearer after "Changing Channels" and "Hammer of the Gods". He knew that Sam would end up breaking the final seal and by killing Dean again and again, he forced Sam to accept that Dean is going to die and that there's nothing he can do about it, stopping Sam from going as axe crazy as he did in Mystery Spot and delaying Lucifer's release from the cage. All because he didn't want to see his brothers fight, didn't want to have to choose a side...
    • Speaking of "Mystery Spot," I'd always wondered how the Trickster did all that when earlier his powers had seemed to consist only of creating figments. Then, later, after I'd gotten through Season Five, it became clear: after all, what powers were necessary to create Sam's Groundhog Day Loop? Time travel, memory erasure, and the ability to bring people back from the dead. All powers later established as belonging not to a trickster, but to an angel.
  • I hated the first episode of Supernatural's third season because Dean was acting like a Jerkass/pod!version of his former self. It wasn't until Fresh Blood and the beautiful brotherly love scenes that I realized he was supposed to be like that. Sam's getting frustrated beyond belief, we're supposed to sympathize with him and we couldn't do that if Dean was acting like his normal self. And it wasn't until the finale when I realized that Dean was being a lying liar that lies when he said he was feeling good about everything, his unbelievably messed up state was just coming out in a different way that what I was used to. --Tinted
    • Rewatching that episode (and, to a lesser extent - Bedtime Stories and Red Sky At Morning), Dean is much less jerkier and far more creepier than I remember. In the manic moments, he's all ducky-lipped and bambi-eyed but that's just surface. Look underneath and there's nothing there. He still doesn't think he deserves to live, he's trying to get Sam to hate him/move on/forget about saving him and when he makes that "I'll think I'll play craps" line in "Red Sky At Morning", he's got a big smile but completely dead eyes. And it's only when Sam plays the little brother/it's all about me card in "Fresh Blood" that he gets a tiny bit better and starts opening up more. I still don't like watching it all that much, but I can begrudgingly admit that was very clever of them. Bastards. --VAD
    • So I'm watching "Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things" and I'm getting annoyed with the "What's dead should stay dead" anvil, right? I'm like "I get it! Dean hates the supernatural, now stop it." Fast forward to "All Hell Breaks Loose" and suddenly it hits me: when Dean says "What's dead should stay dead", he really means "If I'm dead, I should stay dead". Stupid me. Clever show. Poor Dean. --Rampamp G
    • Rewatching all the current seasons (1-4), I really have to wonder how much foreshadowing Kripke et al were doing. In "Faith", LeGrange tells Dean he stood out to him in the crowd, and calls him a "young man with an important purpose. A job to do. And it isn't finished." Cue me freaking out. Season 4 in itself was a masterwork of foreshadowing. -- Lizimajig
    • I always did love the parallelism of Sam and Dean. How Sam in the first season was portrayed as emotional and Dean was more of the tougher guy. Then came Season 4 and their roles were switched around. Dean was the emotional one and Sam was the tough guy. In "Houses of the Holy", in the beginning, Sam was adamant about the existence of angels, while Dean was skeptical. By the end of the episode, Dean was beginning to believe, while Sam doubted. Also Dean was the one to break the first seal, while Sam was the one to break the last seal. Not to mention that Dean slept with an angel and Sam slept with a demon. The last one interestingly played out their roles for the final battle. Dean is Michael's vessel and Sam is Lucifer's vessel.
    • After Anna had became an angel again, I never really gave much thought about how cold and emotionless she became. It was a nice call-back how when she was human, she mentioned that angels don't have emotions, which was probably why she became human in the first place. And yet, contrasting that, we have Castiel, who had started out as emotionless, but slowly became more human, as opposite to Anna.
      • On that same thought, I was really annoyed at the end of Season Five when God brought Cas back and restored his angelic powers and he was so cold to Dean when he said goodbye. Two years of humanization and character development thrown out the window. Then I realized he was a fully empowered angel again, so of course he wouldn't be as human.
    • In the very first episode, when Mary sees that her husband has fallen asleep in front of the TV, she realizes that someone else must be in the nursery and hurls herself upstairs to protect her baby. Now, you'd think even a Mama Bear would take a second to alert her husband (especially one as beefy as John) before confronting an intruder. But in season four, we learn she was actually a hunter before John was, so she may have been even more capable than him of taking on whatever was up there.
      • This makes even more sense once you realize that she knew the Yellow-Eyed Demon and was the one who invited him into their house in the first place. She knew who it was and she didn't want John involved (again).
    • Even though I love the character of Castiel, I was always a little bothered by how whenever he died he'd just magically come back to life with only the tiniest handwave of "God must like him". Given how apathetic we've been told God is, I just couldn't buy that reason. Then after watching the season 5 finale, we find out that God is Chuck! And then it all clicks: when Cas first met Chuck, he told him that he was a huge fan of the books, and then later Cas died trying to 'protect' Chuck. Cas is a fanboy of Chuck without knowing that makes him a fan of his own Father! Of course God's gonna bring Cas back to life every time he dies! --Wandering Raccoon
      • Even better than that is Chuck's archangel is Raphael, who believes that God is dead. So the Chuck is God revealed means that Raphael has actually been in the presence of God the entire time, but was too dense to realize it.
        • Or, possibly, that Raphael was telling them that God was dead because he knew that Chuck was God, and was in fact in on it all along.
      • The revelation that Chuck is God also makes the scene where Zachariah, an angel, threatens to kill Chuck (and bring him back, naturally) amusing. The idea that Chuck/God is helpless against Zachariah, who isn't even an archangel... and Chuck's taking it. It's funny.
        • He must have been somewhat irritated by Zach's threats, since he planned Zach's death.
      • In the Season 4 finale, Castiel has betrayed the Heavenly Host to throw his support with the brothers and thus the rest of humanity. After Chuck gives him and Dean Sam's location and Castiel teleports Dean there, Chuck puts his hand on Castiel's shoulder as they wait for Raphael to come a-smitin'. First viewing? Crowning Moment of Funny. Second viewing? God-as-Chuck showing pride in his son for choosing his own path, using free will, and doing the right thing.
  • I was a bit irritated by how Castiel just disappeared on Dean in Swan Song until I realized that he seemed amused by Dean's question about him being God, and didn't seem as cold as he had originally. He seems to be a personification of how Heaven in going to become. Hopefully.
  • When Sam became soulless, he switched his sidearm to a MK-23 instead of his usual Taurus. At first, I thought that it was just cause Dean had it in the Impala, but then I noticed that I had seen the MK-23 twice before, first as Gordon's sidearm then as Future Dean's sidearm. Thus the MK-23 is only used by very dark characters. Brilliant!
  • It's a fairly small thing, but there is a moment like this in the first ten minutes of the series; we witness the flashback to Mary's death, skip twenty years, and rejoin an adult Sam disapprovingly telling his costumed girlfriend "...you know how I feel about Halloween". At the time, with no knowledge of the characters, it simply seems as if we're supposed to believe that Sam has developed into a studious nerd with no sense of fun; however, look back on that moment with the Winchester boys' miserable, joyless, monster-filled upbringing in mind, remembering that Sam had only escaped from the hunting life a few years before we see him in college, and that line becomes a lot more tragic.
  • Remember how Castiel spent most of "Caged Heat" watching hotel porn and how easily Meg disarmed him? Or perhaps how he just happened across Crowley's bones? At the time, I dismissed Cas' behavior as behavior of a soldier on "leave" from a war zone and the bones with Cas just being awesome. However, based on the Cas/Crowley unholy alliance and the revelation that Cas, not Crowley, brought Sam back from the pit, Cas's sudden interest in porn, ease with which Meg disarmed him, and the Cas/Crowley burning bones conversation takes on extra meaning.
    • Explain please?
      • Cas was falling from grace and working with the forces of hell
  • Sam and Dean's Christmas mundane presents to one another in Season 3 both have deeper meanings. Dean gets Sam porn and shaving cream, just the sort of thing an older brother would get a younger brother as they reach puberty, a way of congratulating them on growing up and "becoming a man." Dean is recognizing that Sam's growing up and that he has to in order to survive once Dean is gone. Sam gets Dean a candy bar and car oil, as Dean puts it, "fuel for me and fuel for my baby." Sam's telling Dean to take care of himself and keep going, they'll find a way to save him.
    • Speaking of that Christmas special, being a troper who actually lives in the metro-Detroit area (where Ypsilanti is nearby), I cracked up upon the revelation that the sacrifices commenced by the pagan gods resulted in mild weather - in Michigan, the land of OCD weather. It made TOTAL sense afterward (never mind that the show is filmed in British Columbia), but just to bring this point home, the year that this episode aired, 2007, we had a freak thunderstorm that resulted in a mild 58-60 degree day on freaking Christmas Eve. No joke. Coincidence??? At least my Christmas was a blast that year.
  • Why does everyone around Sam and Dean (including Castiel and possibly Bobby) seem to die? Death has shown Dean that people who were supposed to die either coming back to life or not dying throws off the natural order and people around the person who should be dead will keep dying off until the original person is dead. And Sam and Dean have come back from the dead repeatedly.
  • When YED was taunting Dean about having killed his family he wasn't just talking about Mary, but also her parents and the rest of the Campbell relatives. Actually, one could argue that YED's fixation on tormenting Dean stemmed from Future!Dean telling Past!YED that he killed him. Methinks ol' Yellow Eyes might have been a tad irritated by that...
  • The covers for the DVDs. At first, the spot on the side where the season number is shown is a bright, colorful red. Then as the show progresses, it gets darker, and so do the season number spots. Right up to six, where it is completely black, reflecting the serious Downer Ending. --Um Lovely
  • When the demon Crowley (who has an English accent) meets Dean, he says something along the lines of "fancy a fag and a chat". Later we find out that Crowley is in fact Scottish, making this also an instance of Getting Crap Past the Radar.
    • Speaking of Crowley, he is introduced as the demon Bela gave the Colt to. It seems a blatant Retcon to allow the Winchesters to get the kill-anything gun back to fight Lucifer... but consider it from Lilith's point of view. Here's a human who's already been established as untrustworthy and out for herself, one who's allied with the brothers before and might do it again. She has a weapon that can kill you and you hold the contract to her eternal damnation. Now, it's very possible that she'll want to just shoot you, kill you, and thus save both herself and El Deano. With that in mind, would you go out to meet her to gain said gun... or would you send a flunky?
    • The crossroads demon Sam intimidates and kills in "Bedtime Stories" mentions a "boss" and refers to said boss as a "he". This seems strange since Lilith is the big kahoona and is later said to hold deal contracts. Could this boss possibly be an early mention of Crowley, King of the Crossroads, later throwing his lot in with Lilith (giving her control of crossroad deals) when she gains sufficient power and influence?
  • When Castiel continues to work with Crowley and eventually absorbs the souls of Purgatory despite the Winchesters begging him not to, one motivation that is cited by fans is that they didn't give him enough support over the seasons and instead just used him whenever they needed Superman's help. But it's so much more than that, because in essence, he does it because that is how the hunters taught him to do it, time and again, with their attitude to personal power, their treatment of it as ultimately a good thing. Their dad sacrifices his soul to save Dean, Dean does the same for Sam, Sam admits that he tried to do the same for Dean. Sam works with Ruby and goes crazy and drinks demon blood and unleashes Lucifer. Bobby sells his soul to Crowley - not to save someone who is in immediate danger, but for a strategic ace, i.e. Death's location, and of course they all work with Crowley in that, as well. Dean all but gives in to Michael and likely would have if Cas hadn't physically stopped him. Sam gives in to Lucifer hoping to be able to control himself despite the literally apocalyptic level of consequences if he screws up. Sam tries to hold on to his soullessness partially for the reason that it makes him "a better hunter", i.e. more powerful. When Dean is turned into a vampire, he chooses to try and use his now superior powers against the vampires and go after them instead of staying put to minimise the chance of feeding and becoming a crazy monster. When Sam and Dean are in the past, trying to procure the phoenix ashes, Bobby lets Castiel power up from his soul, despite how dangerous it is. The point is that whenever there's a choice between crossing a line and ending up with no solution to the current crisis, the Winchesters & Co. have always, without exception, been willing to hop straight across, no matter how great the consequences of failure and how much they have to go behind each other's backs to do it. And the worst part is that, by the end of Season 6, it really has worked out fine, in the grand scheme of things. Conversely, every time Castiel is depowered or drained either in Season 5 or 6, he is expected to try and get his mojo back as soon as possible, and mocked viciously for his powerlessness not just by the Monster of the Week (Lucifer, Meg, Famine, Eve etc.) but by the Winchesters ("baby in a trenchcoat", anyone?), who also throw hissy fits whenever he's not there to help them when they need it, even at great personal cost (e.g. nearly dying by zapping them both back in time to stop Anna), and praise him for his merits as a monster-killing machine. ("Gotta take you on more monster hunts".) In short, they've taught him that his only worth lies in being powerful enough to help them, and that any means is acceptable for the end of procuring power, and if anything goes wrong it will end up fine in the end and they'll forgive him because he's family. With that in mind, it's suddenly a lot clearer why their unthinking condemnation of his plan with Crowley and their subsequent turning against him bewilders him so much. It also proves, to him, that they really aren't family, otherwise they'd trust him and go along with him just as they've always done in such situations.
  • "The righteous man who begins it is the only one who can finish it." Does it refer to Dean... or Sam breaking the last seal and later stopping the Apocalypse by jumping into Hell with Lucifer and Michael?
  • Why is Charlie, a proud Geek and lover of all Badass heroines, so reluctant to join the Winchester brothers and at the end of the episode leaves it all behind to hide? She's Genre Savvy enough to know that she's not an Action Girl or even a main character and will most likely be Stuffed in A Fridge if she stays with the heroes.
  • YMMV, but it just occured to me. The Leviathans as characters might have seemed to come out of nowhere to some fans, but some biblical lore talks about some fallen angels/demons that are so terrible that they were locked away in a bottomless pit. What is Purgatory? A place that God created to keep the Leviathans from wreaking havoc on the world. Just substitute the fallen angels/demons for Leviathans, and give the bottomless pit the name "Purgatory".
  • Why did Crowley spend so much time going over his contract with Dick? He was giving the Winchester brothers more time to get everything they needed, since Dick's plans were quickly coming to fruition.

Fridge Horror

  • Simon Said deals with a nice guy who can persuade people to do anything. The first time the brothers see him, he's walking out of a building and a barely-dressed, beautiful young woman waves out of the window at him. Rape by brainwashing, anyone?
  • All of those innocent people who took the fall for the various murders carried out by Demons and Skinwalkers and other supernatural monsters? Yeah, you can bet your ass that they went straight to prison. Or, depending on capital punishment laws in the state they live in...
  • Adam doesn't seem to have been revived from Hell with Sam. So one can assume he will be in Hell with two archangels until the end of time, which, coincidentally, will take 120 times longer than it would if he were in Heaven or Earth.
    • But since we don't know who or what pulled Sam out, we can assume he might have gotten out too. If not can you imagine the family reunion if he were to get out?
      • As of recent revelations we know who pulled Sam out. And it seems that Adam is still in the cage.
      • And so is Sam's soul. With a bored and frustrated Michael and Lucifer.
      • Sam's soul's out, but Adam's still down there. Even after Dean was offered the chance to get him out. Although he had to choose between Adam and Sam.
        • Though considering Adam didn't really have anything to do with the Apocalypse being averted, he may be spared the same torture Sam went through, at least on Michael's part.
  • In "Sam, Interrupted" the commited hunter friend is now believed to be the one who killed the monster disguised as a patient. His fate is never mentioned again. Could the doctors do something to him before the cops are called?
  • See Rape as Drama in the YMMV section
  • Dean compares Heaven to the Matrix because it's a constructed reality run by the angels. In Season 6, with the revelation that souls are an energy source, it becomes even more like the Matrix.
  • In Supernatural, the episode about the haunted hotel, the "happy" ending shows the ghost girl and recently deceased elderly sister together in each other's company. The unhappiness comes out of the fact that unless they're put to rest, they're gonna go crazy and start killing people in a few decades, as pointed out in the season 2 opening episode. And some for Fridge Horror: remember the victims of the week who they save from the monsters? Not everyone's gonna go along with the world being populated with evil monsters. More than likely every one either went insane, killed themselves or terrified of ever leaving the house. And the fact that they'll never know for sure how to kill a monster without the help of other hunters means they'll make a mistake and end up being killed among other problems they'll have.
    • Considering how violent the demons were, that nearly everybody who had been possessed by a demon is likely to be implicated in various violent criminal acts , including lots of murder. Their fingerprints and DNA would be over all sorts of crime scenes, and there would be witnesses. The choice would often be to go into hiding, or face life imprisonment or death by execution, and either way your life and the lives of your family would be utterly destroyed. Dying of demon related injuries might be seen as the easier option.
      • Angelic possession could be almost as bad since angels are freer from human concerns like covering up after themselves. At the best, angelic vessels and prophets would most likely populate mental wards for years after their last interaction.
        • Plus, it's usually pretty horrifying when the angels and demons engage in sexual activity. The humans whose bodies they are wearing are effectively paralysed, at least partially conscious and most likely have little to no say in what is happening to their bodies. Maybe some of them don't mind it overly, but the whole thing seems a lot closer to rape than consensual sex.
    • The people who were turned into fairytale monsters by the comatose girl. Especially the old lady in the woods, who was as far as we know a genuinely nice person before she got whammied into being a murderous "witch". And what about her family, who will never know the truth?
    • In "I Believe the Children Are Our Future," we get to see what happens to a woman after a demon took over her body and gave birth to its spawn.
    • When Lilith was about to make a deal with Sam, she said that it, "takes more than a kiss to make a deal with her", and pats the bed seductively. Didn't a rather young Bella make a deal with Lilith? ...Oh.
      • Actually, no. Lillith was sealed in hell until the events of the show. Lillith, however, held her contract. Think of the average crossroads demon as a salesperson, trying to sell you talent/fame/success/whatever for the cost of your soul. So a minion of Lillith made a deal with the young Bella, not Lillith herself.
    • The fate of Adam. He and his mother were murdered by monsters just because of their connection to John Winchester. Then he was resurrected and introduced to his long lost half brothers for the briefest of moments before being possessed by an archangel, firebombed by another angel and thrown into hell by his own brothers. Now he's trapped for all eternity in a cage in Hell with two supremely pissed off archangels. We've heard about all the terrible things that happened to Sam and Dean during their stints in Hell, but Adam has now been there longer than both of them and is still being tortured, with no hope of ever being rescued. And nobody, not even his own brothers, seem to care that he's still there, he's barely been mentioned since. All because he wanted to see his mother again. Easily the worst bit of fridge horror in the series.
      • Let's not forget Bela, who sold her soul to stop her father from raping her-only to have both her parents killed. She'd have gone through life an orphan, knowing it was her fault with an eternity in hell looming over her-from the age of 14 to 24.
      • There's Lilith, the first woman, who was persumably kidnapped, tortured, mutilated by Lucifer into becoming a demon, locked in hell for millions of years, and released only to be killed (and wiped out of existence) to free the man who destroyed her life and soul in what looked to be a very painful way.
      • Jimmy Novak's been strapped to a comet, killed, resurrected and kept from his family just because he wanted to do the right thing.
        • And his family had to watch Godstiel go on a months long world wide killing spree while wearing their loved one.
  • Chuck was writing stories based off the Winchester's real lives, right? And there's a small but dedicated fandom following those books in cannon, right? Can you imagine if you were one such fan, who suddenly saw a headline one day—maybe on the sidebar of your homepage as you checked your e-mail—and saw that oh, no, there’s been some sort of bizarre accident, but hey, wait a minute, this guy has the same name as the character in the book I just read… and he looks like he might have died the same way…? And then googling a bit and realizing all of the people who’ve ever died in the books correspond to real people who actually died in genuinely horrific ways in real life?
  • Dr. Gaines (the Leviathan) was "bibbed" and forced to eat himself by his boss, Richard Roman. But remember, before Levi!Gaines took that form in "Hello, Cruel World", he had originally possessed a little girl by the name of Annie. Also keep in mind that the Leviathans don't just transfer hosts, they shapeshift. Wait a second....that means that that Leviathan basically forced a little girl to unwillingly run away from her family and EAT HERSELF. I guess we can only hope that the Leviathans don't keep their hosts conscious like demons do..
    • Well, when the Leviathans first took over Cas, they said he was "dead." Hopefully(?) that means their hosts' minds are totally gone and the little girl wasn't around to feel a thing.
  • While its possible it was simply because Whitman was possibly draining them, the implication that some ghosts go crazy because they have both begun to physically and mentally decay is totally chilling. "Ghost Alzheimer's" as Bobby puts it, simply doesn't do the horror of this justice.
  • As of "Survival of the Fittest," Sam is more alone and at rock bottom than any character has ever been in the history of the show. When Dean went to Hell, Sam had Ruby. When Sam jumped into the Pit, Dean had Lisa and Ben. Right now, though Sam is completely and utterly alone. His brother and one of his best friends are stuck in Purgatory. Bobby is dead. He literally has nobody left. His family is gone. And I believe it was confirmed at one of the cons recently that Lucifer isn't fully gone from Sam's head... What fun we're going to have next season.

Fridge Logic

  • In "Afterschool Special," there's a flashback to Dean being caught cheating on his high school girlfriend. The very first episode was about a Woman in White, who went after men who were or had been unfaithful. But for some reason she chose Sam over him on the basis that he "will be" unfaithful (when she makes him).
    • Also, how did anyone fall for the accident spiel? Her children looked way too old to need monitoring in the bathtub.
    • She thought Sam was hotter. But seriously, that plot point wasn't written yet. Ghosts don't have to make sense.
    • Not to mention which she actually tried to kill BOTH brothers by running them over with the Impala. Sam just happened to be the more convenient target at that precise moment in time given that he was alone in a manner that fit her standard attack method.
    • Its possible she recognised that Dean sleeps around but doesn't get his feelings too attached. Sam on the other hand is deeply in love with Jessica, while the guy in the beginning also seems to have been in love with his girlfriend. This is why such a betrayal and why it encurs her wrath.
  • In "Meat Swap" one of the friends of the kids who swapped minds with Sam got killed. No one mentioned it after at the end. How are the kids gonna explain that?
  • So, the angels use human bodies as vessels when they visit earth. But what happens when they leave? We know that Jimmy Novak didn't have control for the entire time he was a vessel, but where was he while Castiel was going around as a multi-dimensional wave of celestial intent?
    • Perhaps they're left like Raphael's vessel - drooling and catatonic until the angel in question returns to Earth to reclaim them? ... Oh, nevermind, I don't like that theory...
      • I thought that only happened to people possessed by really powerful angels. Jimmy seemed fine the other times he got un-possessed.
  • In "Of Grave Importance", everyone seems to be under the impression that ghosts only have one way out, having their bones burned... except in "Roadkill" a ghost is clearly shown going into the light. Exactly why was this never brought up?
    • It could very well be that this is only possible in very specific circumstances. Both the ghost in "Roadkill" and the one in "Houses of the Holy" only went into the light after an important realisation (usually to do with them coming to terms with what they had become), in both cases with outside assistance. Since the ghosts in the mansion were already aware of their spectral nature, it may be that this was simply not an option anymore. Further, even if this was not the case, those that had become vengeful spirits were already probably too far gone and Whitman Van Ness would have used his own power to keep the others from escaping him in this way. We can assume that the Winchesters and Bobby, being the experienced hunters they are, knew this and simply chose not to discuss it.
  • What criteria does the Blood of the Fallen guide actually follow? Castiel is no longer a fallen angel (technically, he never even was one, he was just cut off from Heaven), so his blood shouldn't qualify. While the Word Of God could be asking for a fallen angel in a more metaphorical sense, there's really no way to quantify a metaphor. And on that note, is there something special about the King of Hell's blood? Theoretically, the King of Hell could be ANY demon, so how does the spell tell the difference?