Jack (webcomic)

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Jack is a furry webcomic by David Hopkins. The main character, Jack, is a rabbit who is also The Grim Reaper. Most of the stories take place in the afterlife or involve death in some form.

Oh, and fair warning, this comic can get very NSFW at times.

Also has a wiki.

Tropes used in Jack (webcomic) include:


  • Action Girl: Farrago, Central, Brisk and Lita.
  • Aerith and Bob: Often due to the incorporation of readers' original characters.
  • Anthropomorphic Personification: Several characters are personifications of one of the Seven Deadly Sins, the one that they committed most egregiously in life. Jack is Wrath.
  • Anything That Moves: Drip, if it doesn't move fast enough when it sees him coming.
    • Although Hell prevents him from enjoying the pain he inflicts upon others.
    • Hell also prevents him from hurting Arloest initially, as he already harmed her in life and his torture in hell involves being unable to touch those he hurt in life unless they give him their express permission. Hence why he is so keen to get her to give him permission via a Faustian deal in "Dinner at Arloest's"
  • Arch Enemy: Among the villains that Jack faces, Drip and Dr. Kane stand out.
  • Art Major Biology: In-universe. Aurthor doesn't really know that much about cancer himself (however he does know that cancer is a group of diseases), but his speech to the press essentially tells them cancer is caused by evil monsters.
  • Art Shift: The "The Once Was Swan" arc.
  • Ascended Extra: Within the series' universe. Literally. When humanity died in the Human-Furry War and furrykind failed to learn from man's mistakes, God ensured that the ensuing history would follow that which came before (sans biological-warfare-apocalypse) as closely as possible. However, certain furry works of fiction, such as Extinctioners and The Funday Pawpet Show, are now mainstream works.
  • The Atoner: Too many to count. Jack seems to be the most prominent one, though.
  • Author Avatar: Pepe Val Pew -- The Devil when shadowed (same character model).
    • There is a black bird, Richek, who was told once that The Devil uses a whole pen whenever Richek appears. Richek is astonished that his very existence inconveniences The Devil.
    • To a lesser extent Drip, Hopkins' personal character for years before the comic was even started.
  • Author Powers: The Devil uses this to really screw with Todd.
  • Badass: Most of the cast.
  • Barefoot Cartoon Animals
  • Be Careful What You Wish For and Literal Genie: Hell tends to twist a person's ideals and fantasies - if all you really want is to belong, then oh, you will. If you want to forget, then day after day, that's what happens. If you want control over life and death... well...
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • Jack and Reckonin pull this off in "Wednesday's Child", and again in "Sever the Hunger".
    • Brisk in "Megan's Run".
  • Bi the Way: Lita and Farrago
  • Black Comedy Rape
  • Bloody Bowels of Hell: one punishment for those who are guilty of the sin of Lust is being fused into a huge, writhing gob of meat, similar in form to a Gibbering Wad from D&D.
  • Body Horror: A lot. See Bloody Bowels of Hell above, for one instance.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: Starting here. It's called the 7th wall.
  • Break the Cutie: This webcomic exemplifies more than any other work of fiction. Good, decent, cute people get REALLY broken and abused, sometimes just for being good, decent and cute.
    • It's no better exemplified than with Fnar, the Innocent in Hell. An unborn baby who died with his mother, Fnar was given the form of a small child and basically told that he's to stay in Hell for the time being but that Hell will not affect him since he did not do anything to be damned personally. His role in the comic is to wander through people's personal tortures not quite grasping what's going on, and acting as Jack's Morality Pet. Fnar even manages to acquire a girlfriend (a deformed demoness introduced in a previous arc as the aborted child of that arc's protagonist) and a pet (A Rework, which is a 28DaysLater style feral zombie)(Fnar fails to notice anything off about either and they both become very much fond of him in turn). Everyone likes Fnar and wants to be nice to him (And those that don't stay uninvolved in his dealings) until Fnar is told he is finally going to leave Hell. This event is treated with a lot of build up and celebration, until Fnar's father Drip, serial rapist in life and the Sin of Lust personified in death figures out his connection to Fnar and molests him right before he was to leave, spoiling his innocence at the last minute. This causes Jack to have a Heroic BSOD where he lashes out at an angel who had been one of Jacks few true friends, spoiling their friendship.
      • In more ways than one, as it leads to a Break the Cutie for her that makes her ask for Laser-Guided Amnesia (from God, no less) so that she could re-meet Jack, ignorant of his past evils.
  • Broad Strokes: The Canon is well thought out but confusing, as time does not exist in Hell, so the plot wanders across earth's timeline. Plus, the "history repeats stuff" makes the timeline confusing but internally logical. Canon only gets really confusing when characters from Rework The Dead start appearing in Jack. Drip is the main problem. Are both Drips the same person? If so, Lita grew up during the events of Rework, but as we see her death and see her alive in the background of Two For You both of which are noticeably rework-free, so either the ability to recover from a Zombie Apocalypse ridiculously quickly is one of the lesser known furry attributes, or Drip died multiple times in the same universe, once killed by a rework that looks exactly like his hell-form, which given the Reincarnation and escaping from hell bits may be possible, or it's paralleled but related Universes, or the damage to the time line is worse that it original seems. The two works seem to fit together, don't think to hard about how.
    • Word of God has said he might one day rewrite Rework The Dead to be more in line with the Jack canon. Think of it as David Hopkin's The Hobbit with Jack being The Lord of the Rings and Cliff being the Silmarilion, or something like that. So Rework The Dead is currently more of an Alternative Universe where things happened differently.
  • Broken Angel: Farrago spends a lot of time as one She gets better! sort of... ]]
  • Bug War: Arc XXIII Debts, which takes place in the future of the furry earth.
  • Bunny Ears Lawyer: Darkly subverted. Doctor Thalmus thinks that developing a cure for cancer entitles him to molest children, even going so far as to hold the cure hostage when Aurthor finds out. No one else seems to agree with his viewpoint.
  • Came Back Wrong: See the entry for Necromantic below, where a Type 2 of sorts occurs: turns out people have difficulty adjusting to being resurrected.
  • Cardboard Prison:
    • Worryingly, temporarily getting out of hell without being reconciled with your sins is possible. More optimistically, getting and staying out if you reconcile them is possible and permitted.
    • For that matter, who designs a holding area and lab for an untested GM creature of human level intelligence that you can break out of with a fork?
  • Cheerful Child: Fnar, though the mere fact that he is one despite the context he's in also pushes him into Creepy Child territory. His reincarnation, Randy, is a clearer example.
  • Children Are Innocent: Fnar deconstructs this trope, by showing that a cute, genuinely innocent and pure kid who doesn't quite understand the horrors of Hell can be as scary as said horrors.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: Pretty much all the souls Jack has collected end up coming back several arcs later.
  • Church of Happyology: All of Arc XXIX is a thinly veiled Take That to That One Church.
  • Cool Old Guy: Jack is one, apparently.
  • Cosmic Plaything: Hopkins makes this one dance a jig when it comes to Todd: He believes himself this, so he becomes this, with the Devil controlling his life. Then he realizes the Devil told him about the Seventh Wall, which means he can invert it and make the cosmos (or at least the comic strip) his plaything, right? Wrong.
  • Crapsack World: Hard to place as since the comic is largely set in hell our viewpoint of events is skewed, and there are some very optimistic bits, however the facts are humanity has been wiped out, humanity's successors are doomed to make the exact same mistakes as humanity in the same order, and worse, hell may as well have a revolving door as far as some of its worse repeat offenders are concerned, there's a Zombie Apocalypse and a war with aliens waiting in the immediate future, and both god and the devil seem to have taken a "hands off" approach to things, leaving the fate of the world to mortals, angles and sins, of which only the worst of the sins seems to have a clear plan.
  • Cursed with Awesome: Most of the characters who are punished with being anthropomorphic personifications of the seven deadly sins are given far greater powers than a normal denizen of hell. However, they're unable to actually enjoy the activities that embody their lust. The angel Central told Jack that one of the reasons the Sins were given power was so that they would not seek out redemption, continuing their punishment in Hell.
  • Days of Future Past: Apparently, when furrykind annihilated the human race (their creators), they ended up being knocked back into at least medieval society, working their way back up to what we would call the present day and beyond. An obvious piece of evidence for this is the first official playing card deck, which shows that when Farrago was alive, she was a medieval-style knight or warrior.
  • Dead Little Sister: Some characters have them as their Freudian Excuse.
  • Dead to Begin With: All the recurring characters are dead, or have been dead at some point.
  • Death Takes a Holiday: Here and here.
  • Deliver Us From Evil:

"Your mother did some pretty bad things. But she would have been a good mommy, and maybe it would have saved her soul."

  • Depraved Bisexual: This does not even begin to describe what is wrong with Drip.
  • Did They or Didn't They?: One chapter had the focus character in this situation.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: In the "What's Pissing off Dalton" story arc, Dalton kills a man because of his speech impediment that causes him to draw out his "s" sounds, which annoys Dalton due to his headaches.
  • Don't Fear the Reaper:
    • Jack is not a completely straight example ( see the YMMV page), but he still genuinely cares for the good souls it is his job to take. Unless they are clearly evil—he IS the sin of Wrath, after all.
    • One arc has Satan pointing out that Jack's ongoing efforts to escape Hell mean that someone else will have to take his place if he succeeds, which will be pretty much guaranteed to lead to an all-out aversion.
  • Downer Ending: "Dinner at Arloest's" and the first story in "Two For You" spring to mind.
  • The Dragon: Brian, to Kane.
  • Driven to Suicide/Suicide Is Painless: A lot of the recurring non-angelic cast took their own lives out of either desperation or a desire for control. No less than three recurring characters were driven to suicide by Drip.
  • Easily Forgiven: Both played straight and subverted regarding the denizens of Hell. Any one of them(up to and including Satan himself) is perfectly capable of ending their time in Hell at any time by recognizing their sins, repenting for them, and asking for forgiveness. Seems easy, but the subversion comes in the fact that the people who end up in Hell tend to, by their very natures, resist doing this, as pointed out elsewhere on this page.
  • Even the Dog Is Ashamed: In the (Non-main-story-cannon) ”Frigid Mc Thunderbones” most of the cast of Jack turn on Hopkins in disgust when they see he's written a killer snowman filler arch. When Drip is asking you "At least spare us a carrot rape scene." you know Even The Rat's Won't Touch It.
  • Every Episode Ending: At the end of every main story arc: "TTFN" (Ta-Ta For Now). Lampshaded in the story arc Twist, Twist, Twist.
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good: Even if they do have good in them, it's clear why the damned are damned: they shift blame around and say it's all the fault of a higher power they got condemned to hell. Some of them (like Lita) get disproportionately incensed at angels whenever they see them.
  • Explicit Content: Although there is the occasional display of nudity throughout the strip, "The Games We Play in Hell" has more than a bit of explicit sex, particularly of the nonconsensual variety.
  • Famous, Famous, Fictional: "... before uzis, RPGs, jets, bars, saws, lazers, power armor and pathmakers"
  • Fan Nickname: God is known as "Cottonmouth" on the Jack forums. It's not because of Her white coat, either.
  • Fate Worse Than Death: The closest thing to it is what Jack does to Drip after Drip rapes Fnar--he devotes a good chunk of his power toward trapping Drip inside him, since if he killed Drip, he'd simply respawn in Hell.
  • Fourth Wall Observer:
    • the so-called insane creature who narrates the "Two For You" arc. He also likes to screw with the reader.
    • Abba from "Megan's Run" chats with "Dave", who appears to exist outside of the comic.
    • Todd isn't so much an observer as he's able to move inbetween panels.
  • Foreshadowing: When Drip promises to hurt Jack worse than Jack's ever been hurt before. He hurts Jack by molesting Fnar.
  • For Science!: exactly why Dr. Kane is creating furries is never adequately explained. Presumably there were Potential Applications.
  • Funny Animal
  • Furries Are Easier to Draw: The author himself has said he's bad at drawing humans.
  • Furry Confusion: Furries are genetically engineered, apparently, so there's nothing weird in a family of crow-men farmers being pestered by crows. There is confusion about how the furry offsring looks like: a cat-girl's elementary school-old kitten looked like a real life kitten, but Littlest Cancer Patients looked like furry kids.
  • Genius Loci: The anthropomorphic personification of Sloth is punished in Hell by becoming the ground.
  • The Grim Reaper: Jack, obviously.
  • Go-Karting with Bowser: For No Apparent Reason ends with Greed catching up to Fnar, Gene Catlow, and Cotton Taylor... and tagging Fnar. Greed was entertaining him, by playing tag, at Jack's request.
  • Good Eyes, Evil Eyes: Whilst Sins, God and the Devil have pupil-less eyes all non-sins in hell are shown with pinpoint pupils until they realize their sin, at which point they are drawn with the full pupils used by Hopkins for the living and Angels. It's also shown that those who have realized their sin can go back to the ominous pinpoint pupils,if they fall in with the wrong crowd, or if they've been brutalized like Vinci in the side story "Pikri Alitheia" after trying to defend Bashful and being half-devoured by the Gorshes. The line "I am alone" implied Vinci's redemption reset button's been hit completely.
  • Good People Have Good Sex: "Well, let me put it this way. In Heaven, they make love... on Earth, they have sex... but down here in Hell, down here... they fuck."
  • Gorn: This is one of the bloodiest, most grisly webcomics out there, peroid.
  • Government Conspiracy: The American government knows that furrykind was created in a laboratory by humans, who used to be the only sentient species on Earth. They currently have archaeologists doing research in the ruins of that lab, which is also heavily guarded. Anyone who blabs about furrykind's secret origins would likely be secretly killed, but given the widespread panic and existential angst such blabbing would cause (i.e. 'We're all descendants of lab-grown creatures, therefore WE HAVE NO SOULS!'), this is a wise policy. However, they also have possible counter-proof of this in the form of Kane's resurrection machine, unless the Government thinks that being brought back to life sent that poor woman crazy and she hallucinated the whole thing. So if they didn't believe her, they're hiding perceived disproof of the afterlife. If they did, they're hiding perceived proof of religion. One wonders which would be more dangerous.
  • The Gwen Stacy: Jill. Subverted because her death only made Jack sink deeper.
  • Groin Attack:
  • Groundhog Day Loop: "The Games We Play in Hell"
  • Half the Man He Used To Be: Taylor from "One Way to Win".
  • Heel Realization: Jack in the last moments of his life.
  • Heroic Bystander:
    • Janice, definitely. So much that Jack is inspired. Also the people in the plane crash.
    • Wendy and Anna in the arc "Wednesday's Child".
    • Swifty at the beginning of "The Superman Project".
    • Brisk all throughout "Megan's Run".
  • History Repeats: Furry civilization and its history are incredibly uncannily similar to human civilization's history, right down to TV shows and individual people like celebrities, to the point where it can't all have been the result of reincarnation of humans, if that was ever a factor in the repetition of history at all. The main source of this phenomenon was probably the lynching of Mr. Grimm, an anthropomorphic vulture who, not long after the end of humanity, attempted to write a manifesto detailing a new society based upon lessons learned from the mistakes of humanity. He was killed by those who didn't agree with his ideas, and those who fail to learn from history are doomed to... well, you know...
    • Maybe the furry history is an exact reflection of human history in the real world, and the history before it was nothing like it. We know that Samson was a furry guy from one of the stories, for one thing, and it's hard to imagine he would be born twice under the very same name. Alternatively, furries might be confused as to the names of historical events when they are in Hell and they might think they took part in events that took place millenia before they were born, just because they e.g. died in a similar war. Hell tends to mess with your memories in Jack, so it's plausible, if a bit weird.
    • Except the sheep telling the Samson story is God, who you would hope would remember, and who seems to have been forced, with no humans left, to press the cosmic "reset" button and start over with what s/he had left, as Reckonin’ says in ‘Sever the Hunger’.
  • Innocent Inaccurate: Fnar
  • Ironic Hell
  • It's All About Me: Most of the damned really can't think (or care) about more than themselves.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Nurse Jeremy Campbell from "It's like cancer". Arrogant and homophobic to some but in fact truly dedicated and caring about his patients.
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: Jack's punishment is to be unable to remember his life on earth. This also counts as Disproportionate Retribution, as since Jack can't remember his misdeeds, he can't truly repent for them, so he's denied the "out" of repentance and forgiveness the other denizens of Hell have. He asked for it.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: The Seventh Wall, actually.
  • Losing Your Head: Nostrom
  • Luke, I Am Your Father:
    • Lita does not recognize who The Sin of Lust is upon meeting him, as his damaged hell form has little resemblance to his appearance in life Jack likewise had no clue he was created by Dr. Kane.
    • It is not reveled to the reader that Drip is Fnar's father right away, and Jack seems to have been keeping the information from Fnar presumably to keep him from looking for Drip (he also neglects to give Lita the exact same "your dad is Lust" info. Neither time did it help).
  • Mad Scientist: Kane, Nostrom, and Jack during his life.
  • Man Behind the Man: Dr. Kane in several story arcs, such as Wednesday's Child and Sever the Hunger.
  • Mature Animal Story
  • Mind Screw:
    • In Arc XXVII, "Why Do I Deserve To Die", Jack delays sending a group of people to judgement after they are killed in a bombed restaurant, allowing them to figure out who among them set off the bomb. Called as such toward the end of the Story Arc.
    • In life, Drip trained three proteges to continue his work after he died (presumably with the thought in mind that he would one day be executed), so that the people who put him away would forever be haunted by the possibility that they got the wrong guy.
  • Mood Swinger: No one character is this specifically, but some of them tend to lean on it. While some slowly express themselves, others can sob gallons of tears and punch people with almost no warning. However, considering what most of the cast goes through in these arcs...
  • Morality Chain: Fnar and Farrago, to Jack.
  • Mondegreen: Susan in the Megan's Run arc seems to hear one of these every other sentence.
  • My Beloved Smother: Drip with his grandmother in a very dark and disturbing way.
  • Name of Cain: Okay its Spelled "Kane", but anyone called Dr Kane who wants to create what are either Half Human Hybrids or Uplifted Animals should never have been given Government permission to do so.
  • Necromantic: This happened the first part of the arc "Two for You", though the male protagonist isn't shown as being especially evil for doing it.
  • Never My Fault:
    • The damned are all over this trope like white on rice. Truly admitting guilt and responsibility for your own actions is the first step out of hell, something most of them aren't capable of. This is one of the reasons a lot of the damned hate angels; it's easier to blame an authority figure who sent you to hell (even if they didn't) than to think you might actually deserve being where you are.
    • Averted with Virgil, who was in Hell only because he killed himself, but was so convinced that he was guilty of the deaths caused in the Columbine-style shooting in the first arc that he didn't even consider the suicide an issue until eventually being convinced otherwise.
  • Nietzsche Wannabe: (Spoilers) and how...
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: "Frigid McThunderbones"
  • No Fourth Wall:
  • Nonhumans Lack Attributes: Played Straight for Jack and Jill, presumably as Kane was Genre Savvy enough to realize making the first batch of his experimental AI's self replicating was a bad move. Noticeably averted elsewhere.
  • Non-Linear Character: As time doesn't exist in the afterlife, everyone dead technically. But Jack in particular who reaped himself.
  • No Pregger Sex: Anna was rather squicked by Wednesday's suggesting sex while she was pregnant, in the arc "Wednesday's Child".
  • Not Growing Up Sucks: In the story arc "Megan's Run", Susan Lancaster and Megan Fairchild are not only not able to die, get sick, or remain injured, but neither will grow old or mentally mature any more than their current state.
  • Oh Crap: Happens a lot. It's bound to, since much of the plot revolves around people dying.
    • The Seventh Wall has an epic one, where Todd learns how to break the seventh wall to escape Hell... except The Devil, who controls the seventh wall, has kept him firmly in Hell. Todd never stops being fun.
  • One Mario Limit: Jack within the story.
  • Only Six Faces: It's not uncommon for furry comics to have characters that are distinguished only by the features of their unique species. It's less common for them to still not be distinguishable despite being radically different species.
  • Our Angels Are Different: they have a sex life, to begin with...
  • Our Souls Are Different: The souls of the dead appear to have some physical form in both heaven, hell AND on earth (otherwise they'd fall though the floor) this enables the dead to move objects, and even kill their murderer.
  • Precursors: It turns out it's man.
  • Parental Incest:
  • The Plan: Kane's favorite MO, especially in "Sever the Hunger" and "Frightened Virgil".
  • The Power of Legacy: This page. Lieutenant Bullock recounts how he told a fellow soldier's parents that their son died while pulling wounded men out of a fire. What really happened... well, it wasn't quite as dignified.
  • Punny Name: Beo Wolfe
  • Rape as Drama
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning/Glowing Eyes of Doom: Played with somewhat. Jack's eyes are pure glowing red most of the time. Since he's the reaper, people tend to take warning. But his actual Wrath Mode turns everything but his pupils black. and those go after his memories are restored.
    • The other sins also have similar eyes. Emily has bright yellow eyes, Drip has green eyes and the others have red ones if they have them at all. God and Satan have uniquely pure black eyes until Sever The Hunger.
  • Religion of Evil: Vince's cult.
  • Religion Is Right:
    • Heavily inspired (but not quite like) by Catholic Christianity, down to the seven deadly sins and purgatory. However almost nobody on Earth knows about that.
    • Subverted in that where you go has nothing to do with your religion. If you cannot forgive yourself for your life sins, you go to hell. If you were enough of a Jerkass, you go to hell. If you commit suicide for any reason, you go to hell (but have an easier time getting out than most). If your evil was of such a prodigious magnitude that hell does not know how to punish you,you become sin itself. It is stated that if you don't believe in God s/he cannot accept you into heaven, though at least this version of purgatory isn't that bad, basically amounting to a peaceful, idealized version of Earth.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter:
    • Fnar.
    • And Randy (even though that IS Fnar). Only David Hopkins could make a skunk-frog hybrid look mind-blowingly cute.
  • Ring Ring CRUNCH: Silverblue stabs her alarm clock. It's not known if she always did, or if she just started because she's been woken up by the exact same sound at the exact same time each morning for 125 years.
  • Rouge Angles of Satin: The spelling is pretty infuriating. "your", "angle" and so on and so forth.
  • Running Gag: The demon of loneliness protesting that his mom's not a whore... and then proven wrong.
  • Sadistic Choice: This comic being what it is, this comes up often.
    • An implied one in a recent arc: Satan introduces Jack to the guy who will be replacing him should Jack actually manage to escape Hell. He's... less than pleasant.
  • Satan: Given the general subject matter of this strip, it's not surprising he makes occasional appearances. Satan in the Jack universe resembles the artist's furry persona, only with all-black eyes.
  • Scale of Scientific Sins: Dr. Kane manages all them, at various points in his life
  • Scunthorpe Problem: Inverted on the forums: the name "Matt" is changed by the filter to "Dolphinfucker". Apparently the artist's wife had a rather scary ex named Matt, who, among various other crimes including stalking her at some point, reputedly did something unpleasant involving a beached dolphin's blowhole (possibly more than once). He also appeared in the comic a couple of times in an Ironic Hell in which he is the victim of rape by dolphins.
  • Self-Inflicted Hell: You can't leave until you let yourself, but whether you arrive in Hell in the first place is pretty objective.
  • Serial Killer: Drip during his life and afterlife. The Vorshes also count.
  • Seven Deadly Sins
  • Shout-Out: among other things, to various other web-based furry works, Redwall, Watership Down, Earthworm Jim, and Nine Inch Nails.
  • Shrug of God - On one page, Hopkins got so involved in the inking process that he accidentally lettered in some notes he had written to remind him how to ink things. Upon realizing he had done this he added a new one, reading "In Hell, you can see the notes."
  • Sliding Scale of Antagonist Vileness and Sliding Scale of Villain Threat are played with, in that they appear to act in inverse to each other as far as the Sins are considered. Given not enough is known to rank Sloth, the six remaining rank up as follows, on the Sliding Scale of Villain Threat
    • Personal Threat: Lust. Although Drip is the one of the seven you'd least like to be forced to spend 10 mins locked in a phone-booth with, in life he was never more than a personal threat and in death is largely too content to sit around raping and torturing to be more than an very, very effective personal threat.
    • Personal threat/City threat: Vanity and Gluttony. Although they either peel your Fur off and wear it or eat you alive, they constituted no more that personal threats in life, and severe personal threats if encountered in hell, they have also, unlike Drip, set out of their own initiative large-scale activates interfering in earth's affairs from beyond the grave such as large-scale disasters such as plane crashes (the Gluttonies) and using an fallen Angel lover to lure several apartment-blocks of living souls into Faustian contracts (Vanity)
    • Country/Global Threat: Greed. A false Messiah and tyrant whose religiously-motivated armies conquered most of the known world in life, and a false messiah whose religiously-motivated mob of followers rules the necropolis of hell in death. At least he's persistent. A greedy, unlikable, physically-replant tyrant, but actually willing to play Hide and seek with Fnar if it will get Jack of his back.
    • Global/Galactic/Universal threat: Envy. Dr Kane Human Evil genius and Mad Scientist Nietzsche Wannabe in life who created the race that wiped out humanity and who eventually fight a war with an alien race, and a machine to resurrect the dead. Although in hind sight known to be part-way between Dr Hubert West, Dr Frankenstein and Dr Joseph Mengele, his one appearance as he was in life makes him come over as no-more than very arrogant and overbearing. After he dies he decides that playing Xanatos Speed Chess with Greed, helping souls escape the Reaper and building up an army of mindless spent burnt-out souls in preparation for a walls or reality destroying cosmic civil war/ prison break he may or not be planning is a constructive use of an afterlife.
    • Universal threat: Wrath. Jack. In his afterlife, the one nice guy out of the lot. In his life, he wiped out humanity and Broke Time!. The damage he did to the universe was so great God basically had to press the "Reset History" button to fix it (although the early history of furrykind erased most traces of humanity, negativing the need for a physical reset). Even in Death it's hinted his Super-Powered Evil Side could wipe the floor with the all other Sins and pose a threat to any and all nearby angels if he ever truly lost control of it.
  • Spikes of Doom: This is how Jack defeats Joen in Those That Run.
  • Stealth Pun: Several, but notably Edward Vade - E. Vade.
  • Traumatic C-Section: Kane threatens to do this to Wendy, as seen here.
  • Tsurime Eyes: How you can tell someone is a bad guy, generally.
  • Ultra Super Death Gore Fest Chainsawer 3000: Evan's favourite game, "Killing Killers and the Killers who Kill Them".
  • Unfortunate Names: Possibly Drip, as a background "Fanfic" written by Hopkins revealed that his grandmother named him after "the sound the blood dripping made when I killed my mother" during his birth. Definitely the detective in the B-movie parody arc Frigid McThunderbones: "Aidsyphilis Smallbush ... It's Greek."
  • Unreliable Narrator: The point of the short animated arc "Twist, twist, twist".
  • Very Special Episode: By Guest Artist Mat Sherer of Badly Drawn Kitties
  • Webcomics Long Runners: This comic has been consistently running for over ten years, ladies and gentlemen.
  • Wham! Episode: "Sever the Hunger". It reveals just what Jack did in life that made him become Wrath--long story short, he wiped out humanity and so thoroughly wrecked the universe that he caused Generation Xerox on a cosmic scale, with furs going through the same kind of history that humans did. The kicker to this is that he himself did not know this beforehand--prior to his own demise, he asked to forget what he had done.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: Jack's fur is bright green, and Jill's is pink/maroon, whereas other furries tend to have more realistic fur colours This makes some sense as adding non-natural pigmentation to transgenic creatures to identify them as such in case they escape into the wild is common real-life practice, although how someone could not notice that a bipedal talking rabbit is GM is another question. The Devil/Pepe Val Pew has got blue fur, but justified as A, he's an Author Avatar and B, The Devil!
    • Both Drip and Lita have bright blue fur (though it's easy to infer that Lita inherited it from Drip). Penelope in the arc "Been Reading Job" also has maroon fur.